who is tara costa dating - Catchy email subject lines for online dating

And when you share the post on your favorite social media platform, be sure to tag the blogger – let them know you followed through…

Adrienne’s and Carol’s comments start with greetings, go straight to compliments, add value to make connections, and end on promises.

Bloggers, just like dates, want to know who’s trying to woo them. In the blogging world, this kind of parroting is a (re)Pete Comment. “I love it when commenters tell me they’ve shared or will share my work.

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(Plus, you don’t want to come across as a creepy stalker.) Now we’re into the meat of what makes a great comment great.

Note: In order to sound sincere, refrain from heaping too much praise onto the bloggers themselves. For this reason, it’s often best to focus on the post rather than the blogger.

Or settle for the faceless silhouette that screams generic nobody? They will be far more likely to feel a connection with you if they can see your face. But unless you’re a spy, or in witness protection, using your real name on a first date is just the right thing to do. How To Do It A great example of this is the following comment Anne R.

(Unless, of course, it’s a blind date and Gary Busey sits down at your table.) The same is true in blog commenting. Allen left Brian Dean in his blogger outreach post here at Smart Blogger.

If you choose to focus on the post itself, talk about a particular point within the post that truly hit home for you. Of course adding value has become one of those overused and meaningless phrases in the blogging world.

Tell them about a specific example where their writing has helped you. Greeting the author and paying a compliment are nice, but no one cares how good the appetizers are if the main course is a garbage sandwich with no mayo. If your comment doesn’t add value, it’s wasting everyone’s time.

Imagine you’re on a date and, halfway through, your date suddenly asks if you have life insurance. It comes across as a cheap attempt to peddle your lemonade on their lawn. When you comment on a post after skimming it or — worse — not reading it at all, you greatly increase the chances you’ll say something silly. Ask them what music they like, and they’ll take you on a 12-minute journey into the minutia of John Mayer’s latest album. It could be the other person actually saying, “I enjoyed myself and would like to see you again.” Whatever form it takes, it sends the message that this date was not just a one-off.

You try to wave it off, but they begin discussing rates and policies with you. And usually it won’t matter how insightful your words are or how relevant your link may be; the blogger will feel an irresistible urge to kick you off their property. Yes, reading a post thoroughly before commenting takes time. One-sided conversations on a date are not much fun and neither are blog comments that last forever and a day. And when wooing a popular blogger, you’d be smart to let them know you’re interested in a longer-term relationship too.

But they’re a critical, often-overlooked component. And most people who try it write comments that suck.

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